Roslyn Byfield Counselling in Islington and Waterloo, Central London

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Confidential counselling and therapy in Islington and Waterloo

Does life feel like it's getting on top of you?
Are you feeling stressed or anxious?
Having problems with relationships?
Could you benefit from taking some time out?
... to explore your thoughts and feelings?
... to understand yourself better?
... to get back on track?

I take part in an ongoing mental health awareness project, mostly sited on Waterloo station in London, to to raise awareness and tackle mental health stigma by sharing information and conversations about mental wellbeing. Stall visitors, who let us know how much more supported they feel when they leave, often tell us 'We didn't know where to turn for information and advice' (we often cannot rely on GPs, sadly) and 'Keep up the great work'. Staff and volunteers from NHS Maudsley, working with British Transport Police, Network Rail, Samaritans and others, regularly mark dates in the mental health 'calendar', such as World Mental Health Day and Mental Health Awareness Week. Watch this space for events coming up....

Call me for a free 15 minute phone consultation: 07896 268349

Feeling anxious, depressed, angry or 'stuck'

Many of us during our lives will experience periods of stress, anger, anxiety, depression, relationship difficulties, confusion or sadness that we find hard to cope with. These can become severe and disabling, interfering with living, and it's not always possible or advisable to talk to family and friends about them. Seeing a counsellor can be helpful, talking and being listened to in complete confidence. I offer a free 15-20 minute phone consultation to help you get a sense of the work and to help you decide whether counselling could be helpful for you - call me to arrange (07896 268349).

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Why see a counsellor?

Experience and research show that counselling and therapy can help people understand themselves and deal better with challenging situations. They can help relieve stress, anxiety and depression and strengthen your sense of self and purpose, leading to more genuine relationships with others, wiser choices and new ways of living. There's more information about what to expect from counselling on the FAQ page.
A helpful source of information about counselling and therapy is produced by BACP (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy), my professional body, called It's good to talk. Here you can find out about different approaches to therapy, how it works and myths and misunderstandings about counselling:

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How I can help

I understand that you could feel anxious about coming to see a counsellor, especially for the first time. I offer a free 15-20 minute phone conversation to help you decide if counselling could be for you. To find out more about what counselling could do for you, visit my "About me and how I work" page.

I'm an experienced counsellor, registered and accredited on the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) Register, working in Islington and Waterloo, both easily accessible from central London. I offer a regular time and a safe, empathic and non-judgmental setting where we work together to explore and understand your difficulties, giving you the time and space to come to choices and solutions which are right for you.

Although psychodynamic theory is central to my therapy practice, I also draw on additional trainings including Person Centred counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Solution Focused Therapy and Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP). I've practiced as a counsellor since 2005, substantially in the NHS, private and voluntary sectors.

A moment's insight is sometimes worth a life's experience.(Oliver Wendell Holmes).

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Special interests

Besides working with a wide range of difficulties (see next page), particular interests are the often linked issues of bereavement, loss and depression, attachment patterns, understanding and managing anger, eating disorders, managing change and unexplained physical symptoms including chronic pain or bouts of illness which don't respond to medical intervention.

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Who do I work with and where?

I work with adults experiencing a wide range of difficulties,including anger, anxiety, stress, depression, eating disorders,family problems, relationship problems and workplace issues,for open-ended or short-term counselling. I'm a counsellor in Islington also offering counselling and therapy in Waterloo. These Islington and Waterloo venues are close to mainline, underground and bus services and easily reached by people living, working or passing through central London or north London and the City.

Listed on BACP's It's good to talk website (Seeking a Therapist).

Registered with Counselling Directory

See my blog for mental health and therapy news. Recent posts on my counselling blog include: EU referendum fallout (see below); how are your relationships?;Blue Monday; when Christmas isn't merry; stress at work; perinatal mental health services and how we mustn't forget fathers; Choosing Wisely Campaign's boost for talking therapies; loneliness and 20 myths about counselling and psychotherapy.

Any questions?

I answer commonly raised issues on the FAQ page but please do get in touch if you have any questions about my counselling service or anything I've written here. I offer a free 15-20 minute telephone consultation (07896 268349) to help you decide about counselling.

Blog 'taster' - EU referendum fall out

July 6 - In the wake of the referendum there as been a widespread feeling that axes have shifted and tectonic plates moved: things are no longer the same, leaving many feeling shaken and profoundly unsettled. Meanwhile the drama and clashes of titanic egos continue unabated, preventing or at least hindering adjustment to this new reality. Counselling and therapy encourage development of capacity to deal with uncertainty, one of the life tasks of mature adults. But what if this huge uncertainty seems never-ending and events in the external world coincide with inner uncertainty?
We could feel even more alone with such challenges because the 'grownups' paid to run the country seem more interested in fighting each other than looking after their 'children'. Such a feeling will especially resonate with those whose early experience included neglect and warring families, undermining our sense of psychological safety.
So what can we do to help ourselves tolerate the continuing uncertainty? Since there's a limit to what we can change in the external world we need to concentrate on ourselves, shoring up our mental wellbeing and resilience by caring for our physical health and practising wellbeing principles. These include staying active, making connections (strangers as well as friends), keeping learning and 'noticing', for example through mindfulness or meditation, all of which can help us feel less disempowered when chaos seems to reign around us.

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